Gardening Does Not Have To Be Hard

When it comes to gardening there is so much information out there that it’s hard to know where to get started. If you are interested in gardening, then you should already know the basics to getting started. If not then these tips should serve as a good place to start as well as a good place to expand on your gardening.

Planting a bare-root rose. Bare-root roses are best planted at the beginning of their dormant period to lessen the shock of transplanting. If the roots look dry, soak them in a bucket of water for a few hours before planting. Remove diseased or damaged stems, and trim any thick roots by a third. Place the rose in a freshly dug hole, spreading out the roots and checking that the bud union is slightly above ground level. Backfill with soil and water thoroughly.

Pull all the weeds in your garden. Weeds can take over a healthy garden faster than you think. White vinegar is one option you can use in your routine weed removal. Use it instead of chemical solutions to kill weeds. So, use a spray solution of white vinegar if you are tired of pulling those weeds by hand.

Roses can be difficult to grow in the best of conditions. Increase your chances for success by choosing the right rose for your climate. If your area has harsh winter conditions look for a rose with thicker petals. Mildew resistant varieties are ideal for humid areas and heat tolerant roses will do best in arid areas.

Wash off your garden harvest before taking it inside your home. Use a laundry basket or some other plastic basket with holes. You can spray down your fruits and vegetables easily with water inside the basket, and the water and dirt will run out. You could also save the water that runs out to water your plants with.

Be sure to test your soil before you plant your garden, if you want to be successful without the need for chemicals. A home testing kit can tell you the pH of your soil, which indicates the likelihood of plant survival. A vegetable garden requires a pH of about 6.5; if your soil is off, you can supplement before your plants start to die.

Plant your own seeds to guarantee organic produce. Sowing your own vegetable seeds gives you the comfort and assurance that your produce has been grown organically from seed to table. Choose plants that are easy to germinate such as broccoli, cabbage, basil and tomatoes. Find out the best time of the year to sprout your chosen produce.

Take care of your containers. You do not have to spend a lot of money on containers: you can reuse common items as pots. Make sure you clean your containers thoroughly and disinfect them to avoid diseases. Drill a few holes in the bottom so that the extra water can be drained.

Planting a living hedge around your property has many benefits. Hedges provide a softer barrier to mark the perimeter of your property and are less forbidding than a structured wall. A living hedge will provide privacy but still discourage trespassing by animals or people. If you have a hedge that blooms, it can be a lovely backdrop in addition to your landscape.

If you have plants that love acid in your organic garden, especially tomato plants, then coffee grounds make great mulch. It’s simple to scatter the coffee grounds around your plants and then sit back and let the high levels of nitrogen help your acid-loving plants grow to great heights all summer long.

A carpenter’s belt is a great investment for any organic gardener. This is because organic gardening involves many small tools that are all frequently used such as trowels, water sprays, pruners, and gloves. Rather than making several trips back and forth between your shed and the garden, a tool belt can help you carry all of your tools at all times.

Do your homework. Gardening, and organic gardening in particular, depends on a lot of variables including crop, climate, weather, soil, and pests. To be successful requires a lot of trial and error. To be as informed as possible, read as many books, articles, and blogs on organic gardening as you can. Those written about your state can be especially informative.

To make your organic gardening venture as environmentally friendly as it is healthy, consider making your own mulch. To make your own mulch, all you need is a soil sample combined with your leftover food products. You can buy a mulcher or manually mulch your waste simply by turning it over every few days.

Gardening isn’t that hard of a topic to get your mind around. You just have to start reading and learning about what you need to do, and then it doesn’t seem so difficult. So the next time you go out and attempt to start or improve on your garden, remember the tips you just learned, and you should be pleased with your own results.

4 thoughts on “Gardening Does Not Have To Be Hard”

  1. Choose certain plants for shady areas. All plants need light to survive, but not all of them require bright sunshine. Woodland natives, for example, are happiest when given a little protection from the sun’s rays. Be generous when enriching the soil if the plants are under a canopy of trees, as they are competing for the food supply with the big guys! Ajuga, anemone, foxglove, cyclamen, hosta, viola and allium all enjoy a shady area.

  2. You can use small clay pots or milk jugs to protect your plants from a late season frost. A bed sheet is also an effective cover on shrubs or large areas. Typically, young sprouts are the most vulnerable. If you forget or your efforts fail, you may be forced to replant the crop.

  3. Grow interesting foliage plants for a showstopping display. Look for plants with unusual and colorful foliage to add year round interest to your garden. Many people tend to focus mainly on flowering plants, not realizing that the blooming season is sometimes quite limited. The most beautiful flowering plants can often have boring foliage, meaning that when the flowers are finished blooming, you are left with quite a dull garden. Add interest with plants grown purely for their foliage. Interesting varieties include hosta, coleus, canna, euphorbia and fatsia.

  4. An excellent way to store the goodies from a homegrown garden is to freeze them in small batches. Using small sealable plastic bags and cutting small amounts of fresh vegetables every few days will help store the extras from the garden. Just bag and toss in the freezer and the packets can be added at any time to soups and pastas year round.

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